Courtroom Roles

Just as there are two sides to every story, there are two sides in every mock trial case. If it is a criminal case, these are the prosecution and defense counsels. If it is a civil case, these are the plaintiff and defense counsels.

Each side has three attorneys and three witnesses. The success of the team depends on a good connection between the witnesses and attorneys.

 

Attorney Roles

There are 3 attorneys on each side. Each side has an opener, middler and closer. Each attorney will direct 1 witness from their side and cross examine 1 witness from the opposing side.

The Opener — This is the attorney who gives the opening statement. They are the first person to tell the story of the events for their side.

The Middler — This attorney does not have a separate statement, however, they are the ones who follow along with people’s directs and crosses. They are also the attorneys who flip through the rules of evidence and case law during objection arguments.

The Closer — This attorney gives the closing statement. This is the last time your side will present their argument for what the events meant. If you are closing on the plaintiff or prosecution side, you get to divide your statement into two parts. First, you present your closing. Then defense counsel presents their closing. Then, plaintiff or prosecution counsel gives a rebuttal to what defense counsel just said, giving you the last word in the trial.

 

Witness Roles

There are 3 witnesses for each side. Witnesses have their own affidavits and that will determine what they base their direct and cross examination answers on. There are two types of witnesses: expert and character. Expert witnesses tend to be doctors or experts with PhDs. They have conducted testing or scientific examination for this case and they present that information for the court. Character witnesses are not experts, but rather people who were involved in the actual events. These witnesses tend to be more dramatic, can have accents, get dressed up and be quirky.

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